Tennis String “Natural Gut”

 

There is no single factor that makes it stand out; in fact, you can get better individual characteristics from a variety of materials. It is how well it melds them all together that makes it special.

Power

The elastic characteristics of natural gut allow it to react to the impact of the ball in such a way that it returns almost all of its energy in the form of velocity. This energy efficiency allows you to use a smooth natural swing, and yet hit harder with far more control.

Control

Natural gut gives the impression of loading up slowly, and accelerating the ball smoothly. Players say the ball stays on the racquet longer. Some report that it “cups” the ball better. Its added power allows you to get all of the ball velocity you want out of a smooth, comfortable, natural swing. This combination of characteristics, added to natural gut’s ability to “bite” into the ball provide excellent control, are what makes it special.

Dynamic stiffness is the way a string reacts to impact.  Natural gut has about the lowest dynamic stiffness which means it continues to “stretch” as the ball makes contact.  This “stretch” mitigates the shock associated with impact and creates a very comfortable ball impact.

 

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Product Review: Kevlar Tennis String

Kevlar is an extremely stiff material and provides excellent durability, as much as 5 times the durability of nylon.

Because Kevlar strings are so stiff and have almost no elasticity, they are mostly combined with another more elastic string to increase playability. A combination of one type of string on the mains and another type of string on the crosses is called a hybrid string job.

The durability of this Kevlar is combined with the responsive playability of a high grade polyamide. The low elongation and high tensile strength of Kevlar prevents abrasion resulting in longer string life. A lively polyamide cross string produces increased energy return to the ball.

  • The kevlar tennis string is the most durable tennis string which is available on the tennis string market.

  • You shouldn’t really use this tennis string unless you are a chronic tennis string ‘breaker’. Watch out, this type of tennis string is very stiff, plays uncomfortably and generates very little power.

  • This is also very damaging for your arm and wrist. If you do use kevlar tennis strings, we advise you to lower the tension by 10%.

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Tennis String Guage

Gauge refers to the thickness of thetennis strings. Thicker gauges offer increased durability. Most strings on the market are between 15 gauge (the thickest) and 18 gauge (the thinnest). The thinner the string, the better it will play-you’ll get more “feel” and control because the string bites into the ball. Thinner gauges offer increased elasticity and spin potential.  The downside: Thin strings break more quickly. Your best bet is to start with a 17-gauge string; if it snaps in 10 hours or less, go to a 16-gauge.

The most commonstring in tennis is 16 gauge. This is what you will find in most tennis racquets. It is the preferredstring for most recreational and competitive players. 16L gauge is a slightly thinner version of the popular 16 gaugestring that dominates thestring market today.

If you’re new to tennis, start with basic nylon tennis string, with a thicker gauge, like 15. As you improve, try out different brands of string, and thinner gauges, until you find the right type of string for you. Determining string tension is a little trickier. If you want control, tennis string it as tight as the manufacturer recommends. If you’re looking for power, string it at the lowest end of the recommended tension. 17 and 18 gauge stings, meanwhile, along with their thinner counterparts 17L and 18L, are used by advanced and professional players who want to create more spin.

Players who are primarily concerned with playability will look for a high resiliency rating whereas players looking for longer string life will choose a high durability rating.

Visit http:silverskysports.com for quality tennis string and tennis products.

 

Tennis String categories, types and kinds

Tennis String categories, types and kinds

Tennis String categories, types and kinds

 

 

Strings are the part of a tennis racquet which make contact with the ball. The strings form a woven network inside the head (or “hoop”) of the racquet. Strings have been made with a variety of materials and possess varying properties that have been measured, such as dynamic stiffness, tension retention, thickness (gauge), string texture (shape of the string), and rebound efficiency.

The material used in tennis string can significantly affect a player’s performance, and even health. Several materials are used to make tennis strings. They vary in terms of elasticity, durability, rebound efficiency, tension holding capability, and manufacturing cost, among other considerations

String Categories

Reels of string
A listing of string reels available in 330′ String Reels, 407′ String Reels, 440′ String Reels, 660′ String Reels, 720′+ String Reels, Kevlar Reels, and Polyester Reels. Durability strings
Perfect for string breakers. Here strings are sorted into durable synthetic strings, aramid/technora string, and polyester based strings.

Best Values(Price vs. Performance)

Find our best-rated strings for performance and value including synthetic gut, polyester, Kevlar and hybrid strings. Colored strings
Strings sorted into color groups of black, blue, gold, green, platinum, purple, silver, teal, white, and yellow string.
String Gauges
Search for strings by the following gauge categories, 15L gauge, 16 gauge, 17 gauge, 17L gauge, 18 gauge, and 19 gauge strings. Hybrid Strings
Sets of string featuring different main/cross compositions for increased playability or durability.
Low Cost Strings
Categorized as separate sets or in reels, strings listed here are great for players or teams on a budget. Maximum Playability String
A selection of gut and high-end synthetic strings with an emphasis on playability over durability and longevity.
Multifilament Strings
Typically more comfortable than solid core strings due to the cushioning effect of hundreds or even thousands of micro fibers. High level of playability and recommended for players suffering from arm problems. Natural Gut
Offering the ultimate in playability and performance, Natural Gut is the obvious choice for players looking for the best performance from their racquet. The most arm friendly string available.

Soft (Arm Friendly String)
A selection of strings with a soft and arm friendly feel at contact. These strings are a great way to soften up a stiff racquet frame.

Spin friendly String
A selection of thin and or textured strings with an emphasis on the development of spin off the stringbed.
String Savers
Get the most from your strings by using string savers. A great way to prolong the life of soft natural gut or multifilament synthetic strings.

Synthetic Gut Strings
A selection of nylon synthetic gut strings varying in construction from single to multiple wraps.
Textured Strings
A selection of strings featuring a textured surface for increased ball bite at impact. Textured strings tend to be very spin friendly.

Polyester Strings
Polyester strings have rapidly gained popularity on the pro tour. Offering excellent durability and a distinct feel, polyester strings are a good fit for hard hitting, chronic string breakers.

For all your tennis needs please visit

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Tennis strings : which tension?

Tennis strings : which tension?

Tennis strings : which tension?

In tennis, the strings are the part of a tennis racquet which make contact with the ball. The strings form a woven network inside the head (or “hoop”) of the racquet. Strings have been made with a variety of materials and possess varying properties that have been measured, such as dynamic stiffness, tension retention, thickness (gauge), string texture (shape of the string), and rebound efficiency.

Tension of a tennis racket
The tension of a tennis racket is the number of kilograms which are being placed on the tennis string at the moment they are strung into the tennis racket.
Stringing and power are reversibly related, just like power and control.
The more tension on a tennis racket, the less power, the more control.

For all your tennis needs please visit

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Save on your Tennis string Expenses today

Save on your Tennis string Expenses today

Save on your Tennis string Expenses today

 

Save on your Tennis string Expenses today

Order Through Credit card Online | western Money Transfer
Shipment Through LBC or Philpost Internationally

Dealers or Distributors are Welcome

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Tennis String Composition

The material used in tennis string can significantly affect a player’s performance, and even health. Several materials are used to make tennis strings. They vary in terms of elasticity, durability, rebound efficiency, tension holding capability, and manufacturing cost, among other considerations.

Natural Gut

Animal intestine is the most resilient material used to make tennis strings. It has better tension retention than any other material, and also is softer than any other material used for tennis strings. It provides the most energy return, meaning it is the most efficient string. It remains soft at high tensions while other materials tend to dramatically stiffen. This allows gut string to enable players to string rather tightly to improve ball control without losing much rebound efficiency (power) and without greatly increasing impact shock, which can hurt the elbow and other joints.

Its principal drawbacks are much higher cost to manufacture and purchase than other materials, weakness to shear stresses from off-center hits (typical of beginning players), variable quality control depending upon the brand, batch, age, storage conditions, and grade, difficulty of stringing due to its delicacy, and poor durability when wetted with water. Natural gut is very sensitive to different types of weather and those players who use it normally carry several different racquets with different tensions to compensate for this. Some players, particularly those who hit flat shots and hit the sweet spot consistently, find high-quality gut to be more durable than many other types of strings due to its outstanding tension retention. This may help to offset the high initial cost. The use of a dense string pattern also generally improves the longevity of natural gut.

Natural gut is produced by drying fibers extracted from a part of the cow intestine called the serous membrane, or serosa, which contains collagen designed to withstand the stretching and contraction of the intestine. It is this elasticity that makes the fibers useful for tennis string. Sheep intestines have also been used for racquet strings in the past.

The first natural gut tennis string was rumored to be manufactured in 1875 by Pierre Babolat, who would launch the VS brand of gut fifty years later. Natural gut is usually offered in coated form, to reduce its tendency to unravel, particularly when humid or wet.

Synthetic Gut

Synthetic gut is nylon, nearly always composed of a single filament. It is a very inexpensive string to manufacture and is generally the least expensive string to purchase.

Small changes from pure nylon are usually found in strings sold as “synthetic gut”. Textured coatings, colorants, and the addition of a small amount of Kevlar are the most common changes. Some manufacturers, such as Gosen, label nylon strings with words like “sheep”, as in sheep intestine, although such strings contain no gut.

Synthetic gut, as it is used for mono-filament nylon strings, is now a misnomer, as the creation of multi-filament strings has provided players with a better approximation of natural gut’s performance. Modern “synthetic gut” is actually a multi-filament string that holds its tension extremely well and which has a dynamic stiffness profile that is closest to natural gut, although the industry continues to apply the term to mono-filament nylon strings.

Multi-filament, or “Multi”

Multi-filament strings, known commonly as “multis” are strings that have more than one filament. They are most commonly made of many filaments of nylon, but can incorporate other materials such as polyurethane, Zyex, Vectran, Kevlar, and other materials. Multi-filament strings offer better elasticity than single filament strings, but usually inferior durability. No multi-filament string holds its tension as well as natural gut, and none of them is as soft.

However, in comparison to mono-filament “synthetic gut”, multi-filament strings can offer a much closer approximation of natural gut’s performance. The softest multi-filament strings can be made with Zyex and polyolefin, although some of the softest of these strings are no longer on the market.

Nylon

Nylon is the most popular string material for amateur players due to its low cost and the improvement in elasticity offered by multi-filament strings. Wear-resistant coatings for nylon strings are common, especially with multi-filament strings, because the outer filaments tend to break first as the racquet is used.

Polyester

Polyester is a stiff and durable string material, originally intended for use by frequent string breakers. It took the string time to become popular, primarily due to its poor tension holding capability. However, players feel they are able to apply more topspin to balls while maintaining control with polyester strings. Polyester’s support for heavy topspin in particular has made it the most popular material in the pro tour. The increased topspin due to polyester strings has been verified with controlled experiments. The exact cause for the increased spin is not known but there is strong evidence that the low friction between strings is a factor.

Kevlar

Kevlar is the stiffest, most durable synthetic string available,and is thus extremely hard to break. Although it is one of the best strings in terms of tension holding capability (next to natural gut), it is the most dangerous string when it comes to developing tennis elbow. Kevlar is often strung with another string, such as nylon), in order to combine both strings’ qualities, as Kevlar by itself feels too stiff for many tennis players, especially when combined with a stiff racquet. Some advocate using a very thin gauge Kevlar for increasing comfort, but even in the thinnest gauge it is a stiff string. Another strategy to increase comfort and improve rebound efficiency is to string Kevlar at a low tension.

Vectran

Vectran is the penultimate string in terms of stiffness and durability. It is perhaps the least commonly used contemporary string material. It is usually added to nylon string to increase nylon’s durability and stiffness, as with Kevlar. Yonex, for instance, offers two badminton strings, made primarily from nylon, which have Vectran strands. However, the Ashaway company offers a braided Vectran tennis string.

Zyex

Zyex string offers more rebound efficiency, i.e. gut-like dynamic stiffness, than other synthetic strings, particularly when strung at low tensions. This gives it playability that is more similar to natural gut than, arguably, other synthetic materials. It also has low overall stiffness. The Pro Kennex IQ Element Z string, for instance, has the lowest stiffness of any synthetic string yet tested.[1] The drawback of Zyex is that the outer wrapping materials in Zyex tennis string tend to be much less durable than the Zyex filaments inside the string and do not bond with them. This can lead to the outer wrapping wearing away, leaving the inner Zyex filaments.

Polyolefin

Polyolefin is one of the softest synthetic string materials, rivaling some Zyex and most nylon multi-filaments. It offers mediocre durability and tension retention, so it is generally used as the cross string in a hybrid string setup. For those who do not break strings very quickly, however, 100% polyolefin stringing may be a good alternative to natural gut and multi-filament strings. This is especially true for those who have had tennis elbow and find natural gut string to be too costly.

Metal wire

Metal wire, usually piano wire, was used in some historical racquets

 

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SILVER SKY POLYMAX 17 IN REEL TENNIS STRING

SILVER SKY POLYMAX 17 IN REEL TENNIS STRING

SILVER SKY POLYMAX 17 IN REEL TENNIS STRING

Silver Sky Polymax has almost no tension loss, excellent ball control, and is spin friendly. This is a great choice for the player seeking power, without sacrificing any durability. This string has excellent playing comfort and playability. Polymax maintains tension very well.

Compares to Babolat Pro Hurricane 

For all your tennis needs please visit

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Incoming search terms:

SILVER SKY REDLINE ROUGH BANGER 16 POLYESTER TENNIS STRING

SILVER SKY REDLINE ROUGH BANGER 16 POLYESTER TENNIS STRING

SILVER SKY REDLINE ROUGH BANGER 16 POLYESTER TENNIS STRING

Add some twist to your game with Rough Banger. Not only is co-polyester string heptagonal in shape, it’s twisted and textured for even more bite on the ball. This crisp feeling string provides a ton of access to spin for good control while holding tension well and having good durability.

Compares to Luxillon Alu Rough/Signum Pro Tornado

For all your tennis needs please visit

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